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Date and Time

4th September 2020

Location

Online

Speakers and Artists
  • Catherine Hall
  • Ruth Ramsden-Karelse

The term ‘reconstruction’ is often used to characterize a moment in time where a series of events force a period of political, social and economic reorganisation. This past year, the Covid-19 pandemic and the sustained Black Lives Matter protests have prompted a collective reassessment of the past in order to make sense of present-day inequalities. Stuart discussed ‘reconstruction’ as an opportunity to “reinscribe the past, reactivate it, relocate it and resignify it” in order to work through the present, reinterpret the future and to imagine something else. Our #reconstructionwork series implements Stuart’s thinking through a series of online public conversations where we invite writers, artists and activists to critically consider how we can build a better society in response to the Covid-19 crisis and the Black Lives Matter protests worldwide.

For our third conversation in the series, you will meet SHF trustee Catherine Hall, Emerita Professor of History and Chair of the Centre of the Study of British Slave-ownership at UCL, and Ruth Ramsden-Karelse, founder and co-convener of the Oxford Queer Studies Network and Stuart Hall scholar at Merton College, Oxford University. 

The most recent wave of Black Lives Matter protests has rejuvenated popular debate over the removal of statues of British slave owners from public spaces. The fall of the Edward Colston statue in Bristol and calls to remove statues of Winston Churchill, Lord Nelson and Cecil Rhodes has forced the British public to reconsider questions of history and colonial legacies.

Catherine and Ruth will explore the importance of new histories, Reparations, working to decolonise education and shifting collective memories in the effort to imagine new futures.

 
Learn more about our #ReconstructionWork Programme here

Speakers and Artists

Catherine Hall

Catherine Hall is Stuart’s widow. She is a historian and works on questions of race and empire in Britain and Jamaica. She  led the Legacies of British Slave-ownership project at University College London for ten years,  exploring Britain’s long history in relation to the slavery business. She is now the Emerita Chair of the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of  British Slavery at UCL. Catherine has published extensively on questions of race, gender and empire.

Ruth Ramsden-Karelse

Ruth Ramsden-Karelse is founder and co-convener of the Oxford Queer Studies Network and a DPhil candidate in the English Faculty at the University of Oxford. The inaugural Stuart Hall Doctoral Studentship, in association with Merton College, the Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities and the Stuart Hall Foundation, supports her research on the world-making capacity of collaborative works by self-described gays and girls from communities formerly classified “Coloured” in Cape Town, South Africa, from 1950 to the present, with a specific focus on the Kewpie Photographic Collection. Ruth’s writing has appeared in GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies.